Friday, May 2, 2014

Expectations Parents Have for Their Children

We are all concerned by parents' expectations for children, be it because we are ourselves parents, and thus consequently have expectations for them, or because we are all somebody's child, for whom our parents have or had expectations. Now, expectations are normal, but they are mostly linked to the way we see the world, and what is best according to us. And this is what's problematic. As everyone is different, nobody can have the same expectations for his/her life. And the same goes for parents, who trace their expectations for their children on things they wish they would have themselves done if given the opportunity now. Even though expectations are logical, they can have important consequences on children, and with the remains of which they'll probably be living for the rest of their lives. I have found many articles about this subject, and so rather than to go on and repeat what others say better, I'll just introduce you to the ones I preferred, so that you can judge whether you'd be interested to read them or not. 

The first one is called "What effects do parental expectations have on kids?", and basically deals with the fact that the children internalize what the parents want or think are good, so that the children's ideas of success mostly relies on how much of what their parents have expected of them they have achieved: 

The second one, "Parental expectations for their children's academic attainment" focuses more on the fact that school oriented achievements of parents to their children, and basically shows that children whose parents have higher expectations for their future, seemed to achieve more than other children, if the expectations were to be accompanied by love and support. 
http://www.childtrends.org/?indicators=parental-expectations-for-their-childrens-academic-attainment

The third one, "What should you expect of your child?", focuses more on how we should understand the source of our expectations for our children, so that we can adapt them to our children's personality, and not expect things incompatible with who they are, their personality, or their wishes.
http://www.familyservices.bc.ca/resource-library/parents-a-families/95-expectations

The fourth and last one is a study which tries to understand the boundary between "Parents' Values and Children's Perceived Pressure", and how it all happens:
http://cty.jhu.edu/research/topical/pressure.html

Have a great day, and keep your mind sharp!

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